Practice Makes Perfect

Practice Makes Perfect

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Posts tagged reference

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rapidpunches:

I used to draw people according to head size (average human is anything from six to eight heads with comic book heroes around what… ten or eleven heads in height) buuut that’s too much to think about.

These days I organize all bodies into four parts that I can elongate, scale up, or scale down, keeping in rule of quarters. Cambiaso figures! It’s legit for reals.

My figs kinda suck but whatevs. I need a post that makes me sound almost smart about… things.

(via art-and-sterf)

Filed under Anatomy Anatomy Reference Reference references gesture gesture reference

647,942 notes

jumpyhyliannetop:

itsmydarkesthour:

hippies-like-us:

kuneria:

Bob Ross soothes and calms and makes me happy like nothing else I’ve ever known.

Fun fact: Bob Ross was a Marine drill sergeant for several years, but quit because he didn’t like yelling at people.

PRIVATE WHY ARE YOU NOT SMILING IF YOU DON’T LOVE YOURSELF WITHIN THE NEXT 3 SECONDS YOU ARE GOING TO DROP AND GIVE ME 50

(Source: kunerias-huge-dick, via art-and-sterf)

Filed under tip tips painting reference references reference

328,557 notes

starshipsandsuperheroes:

rangerkimmy:

driftingfocus:

Take note: this is how to properly disarm someone. Always go to the outside of the arm, not the inside.

ah yes I have been doing it wrong the whole time it seems cowering in fear was not the first step

I usually hate writing on posts but I’ve been studying for karate for the past few weeks/days/hours for my big test which is why it seems to be all I’m talking about, so you get more on this lucky followers and I can call it studying
When disarming someone of any weapon (gun, club/baseball bat, knife, etc), there are three things to remember, and they can be summed up in the acronym ACD:

1.) Avoid the weapon

This one may seem really obvious, but it’s incredibly necessary.  See how the guy sidesteps the gun first?  If he was to go straight into the attacker, the attacker would still have the ability to shoot him.  If he’s off to the side and behind the attacker, there’s much less of a chance (if a chance at all) that the attacker will be able to shoot/stab/beat the victim.  Every weapon is different.  A gun to the temple is different from a knife stabbing motion towards your gut.  With the first, you’d want to bat it out of the way and step to the outside of the arm.  With the second, you’d be better off either stepping to the side or shooting your legs and stomach back and bringing your wrists (crossed over each other) down on the attacker’s wrist.  Clubs are a bit different.  I would suggest dodging the first swing until their arm has crossed their body, then stepping to the outside of the arm and throwing up your arms to block along the wrist and elbow or the pressure point between the bicep and tricep.
  In short, as long as you can get out of the way of the weapon, you’re safe to either finish them off or escape, though I would suggest following through and finishing them off.

2.) Control the weapon and attacker

When the guy above locks the attacker’s elbow out and drops him to the ground, that is controlling the weapon.  The technique you can see is actually rather basic, if you break it down.  I’m going to break this one up into multiple paragraphs because it’s the most complicated, so brace yourselves
A gun is the hardest to control.  The good news is, most people who will hold a gun to you on the street are either scared or morons.  This means they’ll hold it with one hand, which is a weak grip.  The bad news is that most people who will hold a gun to you on the street are either scared or morons.  This means they’ll keep the finger on the trigger of the gun rather than leaving it outside the guard until they intend to shoot.  Because of this, you’ll have to be careful not to twist their wrist too much, or be certain you’re out of the way of a bullet if you do.  For any gun defense, I would suggest attacking the elbow and the knee.  Attack the elbow first, then the knee, however.   The second half of his takedown is much more complicated, but the first half is basic enough.  Lock the elbow by using either your other forearm (the one of the arm not holding onto the attacker’s wrist now that you’ve blocked the weapon), or something like a hipbone.  If you use your forearm, press forward and kick out their knee with a low sidekick.  Chances are, they’ll fall to the ground, with you on top.
With knives, there are really only two motions- a slash and a stab.  A slash is nice because if you can jump back in time, you can catch their arm as they swing back (which they will, as momentum across the body will transfer and swing the arm back across to it’s “normal side”).  Your takedown options from there are very similar to the gun defense ones listed above then.  With a stab, we’ve already discussed shooting back and blocking the attack with a cross block.  From there, you can either still pass it off to the side as discussed above and keep one hand on the attacker’s hand, or you can circle it.  To circle, you would straighten up and bring your arms above you around in a big circular motion, holding onto the attacker’s arm the entire time.  At the top of your circle, switch so one hand is holding the outside of the hand of the attacker and the other is pressing down on the attacker’s elbow.  This will lock their elbow up and force them to bend over, giving you plenty of opportunity to knee them in the ribs/face/nuts/etc.
Clubs are simultaneously the easiest and hardest to defend.  Because they’re heavy and a dumb attacker will likely swing with one hand, you can easily dodge the first and sidestep the second like a knife slash, but be wary of the extra weight adding to momentum.  A two handed attack is much more difficult and stronger, but will likely be coming from above.  Instead of stepping back to avoid this one, step in towards the person.  Then, you can defend with a knee to the balls or a side/back kick to the knees.
The most important thing about this step is to not only control the attacker’s arm, but have complete control of the weapon itself.  Know which way it is pointing, know where it is in relation to your body, know how strong a grip your attacker has on it.  These are all very important to the next step.  Also, keep a hand on the attacker’s weapon hand at all times to make sure it doesn’t get too close to you.  Make sure this hand is somewhere around their wrist or even thumb area, as this will make the final step much easer.

3.) Disarm your attacker

This is the final, vital step to safely defending yourself against a weapon attack.  If your attacker still has the weapon in their possession, there is nothing to stop them from attacking you again, so you want to make sure you take the weapon with you when you book it from the scene of the attack.
A gun is the weapon that it’s most important to be careful with, especially for someone with little to no experience handling the weapon.  If the safety is off, the gun could go off at any second, and even if you think it’s not, assume it is and act like it.  Better to be safe than sorry.  
The technique above is a wrist lock that causes the attacker to let go, but I have another, easier one.  First, make a fist with one hand and squeeze just under your knuckles with the other.  See how your fist opens up?  I once called this the “jelly fist” technique in a class as a joke, but the name has stuck with me.  What you’re doing is pushing the bones of the hand together.  Done with enough force, this can be very painful, and will loosen an attacker’s grip on the weapon easily.  However, this technique can also be difficult if someone has a drastically stronger grip than you do, as they will be able to resist your squeezing.
in those situations, you can continue to press down on their elbow if you’re on the outside of their arm until you walk them into the ground, but keep their hand in the air.  Walk it backwards, towards them, and they’ll cry out in pain.  Trust me, that’s not fun.  Distracted, their grip will likely loosen.
For the circle techniques, as you’re circling, slide your hands down so that you line up your two thumbs between the skin of the attacker’s thumb and first finger, like you’re texting.  Their hand should be pointed up.  Push down and backwards on their hand,towards the outside (not towards their body).  This is another basic wrist lock that will get them to release the weapon.
OTHER STUFF YOU MAY WANT
Make sure you are in control of the weapon before trying to leave the scene, and never turn your back on an attacker that is still able to attack you.  Be safe, be aware of your surroundings, and shout as you defend.  It’ll scare your opponent and throw them off, and distraction is always an advantage.  You can literally yell anything.  We did an exercise with this once, and the first thing out of my friend’s mouth was “I REALLY REALLY LIKE WAFFLES,” and another’s was “SO HOW’S THE WEATHER TODAY?”  Another example was even “I JUST REALLY WANT TO GO TO DISNEYLAND.”  Anything that will throw an opponent off works.  You’ll have time to be embarrassed about whatever High School Musical line comes out after you’re away, but in the moment, scream the first thing that comes to your head.
If you read all that, god bless.
If you have any fixes, please don’t be afraid to add them or message me, as I’m constantly learning from my mistakes.

starshipsandsuperheroes:

rangerkimmy:

driftingfocus:

Take note: this is how to properly disarm someone. Always go to the outside of the arm, not the inside.

ah yes I have been doing it wrong the whole time it seems cowering in fear was not the first step

I usually hate writing on posts but I’ve been studying for karate for the past few weeks/days/hours for my big test which is why it seems to be all I’m talking about, so you get more on this lucky followers and I can call it studying

When disarming someone of any weapon (gun, club/baseball bat, knife, etc), there are three things to remember, and they can be summed up in the acronym ACD:

1.) Avoid the weapon

This one may seem really obvious, but it’s incredibly necessary.  See how the guy sidesteps the gun first?  If he was to go straight into the attacker, the attacker would still have the ability to shoot him.  If he’s off to the side and behind the attacker, there’s much less of a chance (if a chance at all) that the attacker will be able to shoot/stab/beat the victim.  Every weapon is different.  A gun to the temple is different from a knife stabbing motion towards your gut.  With the first, you’d want to bat it out of the way and step to the outside of the arm.  With the second, you’d be better off either stepping to the side or shooting your legs and stomach back and bringing your wrists (crossed over each other) down on the attacker’s wrist.  Clubs are a bit different.  I would suggest dodging the first swing until their arm has crossed their body, then stepping to the outside of the arm and throwing up your arms to block along the wrist and elbow or the pressure point between the bicep and tricep.

  In short, as long as you can get out of the way of the weapon, you’re safe to either finish them off or escape, though I would suggest following through and finishing them off.

2.) Control the weapon and attacker

When the guy above locks the attacker’s elbow out and drops him to the ground, that is controlling the weapon.  The technique you can see is actually rather basic, if you break it down.  I’m going to break this one up into multiple paragraphs because it’s the most complicated, so brace yourselves

A gun is the hardest to control.  The good news is, most people who will hold a gun to you on the street are either scared or morons.  This means they’ll hold it with one hand, which is a weak grip.  The bad news is that most people who will hold a gun to you on the street are either scared or morons.  This means they’ll keep the finger on the trigger of the gun rather than leaving it outside the guard until they intend to shoot.  Because of this, you’ll have to be careful not to twist their wrist too much, or be certain you’re out of the way of a bullet if you do.  For any gun defense, I would suggest attacking the elbow and the knee.  Attack the elbow first, then the knee, however.   The second half of his takedown is much more complicated, but the first half is basic enough.  Lock the elbow by using either your other forearm (the one of the arm not holding onto the attacker’s wrist now that you’ve blocked the weapon), or something like a hipbone.  If you use your forearm, press forward and kick out their knee with a low sidekick.  Chances are, they’ll fall to the ground, with you on top.

With knives, there are really only two motions- a slash and a stab.  A slash is nice because if you can jump back in time, you can catch their arm as they swing back (which they will, as momentum across the body will transfer and swing the arm back across to it’s “normal side”).  Your takedown options from there are very similar to the gun defense ones listed above then.  With a stab, we’ve already discussed shooting back and blocking the attack with a cross block.  From there, you can either still pass it off to the side as discussed above and keep one hand on the attacker’s hand, or you can circle it.  To circle, you would straighten up and bring your arms above you around in a big circular motion, holding onto the attacker’s arm the entire time.  At the top of your circle, switch so one hand is holding the outside of the hand of the attacker and the other is pressing down on the attacker’s elbow.  This will lock their elbow up and force them to bend over, giving you plenty of opportunity to knee them in the ribs/face/nuts/etc.

Clubs are simultaneously the easiest and hardest to defend.  Because they’re heavy and a dumb attacker will likely swing with one hand, you can easily dodge the first and sidestep the second like a knife slash, but be wary of the extra weight adding to momentum.  A two handed attack is much more difficult and stronger, but will likely be coming from above.  Instead of stepping back to avoid this one, step in towards the person.  Then, you can defend with a knee to the balls or a side/back kick to the knees.

The most important thing about this step is to not only control the attacker’s arm, but have complete control of the weapon itself.  Know which way it is pointing, know where it is in relation to your body, know how strong a grip your attacker has on it.  These are all very important to the next step.  Also, keep a hand on the attacker’s weapon hand at all times to make sure it doesn’t get too close to you.  Make sure this hand is somewhere around their wrist or even thumb area, as this will make the final step much easer.

3.) Disarm your attacker

This is the final, vital step to safely defending yourself against a weapon attack.  If your attacker still has the weapon in their possession, there is nothing to stop them from attacking you again, so you want to make sure you take the weapon with you when you book it from the scene of the attack.

A gun is the weapon that it’s most important to be careful with, especially for someone with little to no experience handling the weapon.  If the safety is off, the gun could go off at any second, and even if you think it’s not, assume it is and act like it.  Better to be safe than sorry.  

The technique above is a wrist lock that causes the attacker to let go, but I have another, easier one.  First, make a fist with one hand and squeeze just under your knuckles with the other.  See how your fist opens up?  I once called this the “jelly fist” technique in a class as a joke, but the name has stuck with me.  What you’re doing is pushing the bones of the hand together.  Done with enough force, this can be very painful, and will loosen an attacker’s grip on the weapon easily.  However, this technique can also be difficult if someone has a drastically stronger grip than you do, as they will be able to resist your squeezing.

in those situations, you can continue to press down on their elbow if you’re on the outside of their arm until you walk them into the ground, but keep their hand in the air.  Walk it backwards, towards them, and they’ll cry out in pain.  Trust me, that’s not fun.  Distracted, their grip will likely loosen.

For the circle techniques, as you’re circling, slide your hands down so that you line up your two thumbs between the skin of the attacker’s thumb and first finger, like you’re texting.  Their hand should be pointed up.  Push down and backwards on their hand,towards the outside (not towards their body).  This is another basic wrist lock that will get them to release the weapon.

OTHER STUFF YOU MAY WANT

Make sure you are in control of the weapon before trying to leave the scene, and never turn your back on an attacker that is still able to attack you.  Be safe, be aware of your surroundings, and shout as you defend.  It’ll scare your opponent and throw them off, and distraction is always an advantage.  You can literally yell anything.  We did an exercise with this once, and the first thing out of my friend’s mouth was “I REALLY REALLY LIKE WAFFLES,” and another’s was “SO HOW’S THE WEATHER TODAY?”  Another example was even “I JUST REALLY WANT TO GO TO DISNEYLAND.”  Anything that will throw an opponent off works.  You’ll have time to be embarrassed about whatever High School Musical line comes out after you’re away, but in the moment, scream the first thing that comes to your head.

If you read all that, god bless.

If you have any fixes, please don’t be afraid to add them or message me, as I’m constantly learning from my mistakes.

(Source: deaglefifty, via jzumun)

Filed under reference self defence

841 notes

Hey kiddos! Let’s talk about freckles!

thisnameisquitedanny:

So, I’ve seen a lot of fan produced media, and even professionally produced media that gets freckles all wrong so I thought, as a collector of freckles I might try to lend a helping hand

So I guess we should first start off with is, what are freckles and how do you get them?

Freckles are natural skin damage from the sun. Everyone gets sun damage to some degree, even if you bathe in sunscreen everyday. Now of course, not everyone in the world has freckles. That’s because people with paler skin are more likely to get them, but even in that case not all pale people produce freckles and people with darker skin may also produce freckles but are less likely too. I read an article once that severe freckling is the cause of the body’s inability to produce a tan, so instead of getting a nice even color you get spots. I don’t know how much truth there is to that but it makes sense. 

Anyways, I’m rambling. The point is that’s what causes freckles. Now I’ll move on to the points of correction:

incorrect freckle fact #1: babies aren’t born with freckles

As stated above, freckles are the cause of exposure to sun. Drawing a baby with freckles makes about as much sense as drawing a baby with a tan. Just because one of the parents has freckles doesn’t mean the baby grew spots in the womb. Which leads to me to my second point

Incorrect freckle fact#2: Freckles aren’t hereditary

Now of course, the physical tributes that cause freckles are passed on to you by your dna but the freckles themselves are not. Basically what I’m trying to say is I’m tired of seeing family members who have the same exact pattern of freckles that’s not how freckles work! They can be simililar but are not the same. Think of freckles as tiny tons of birthmarks. Do you and your mom have all the exact same size, shape, color, and position of birthmarks? No, of course not.

Incorrect freckle fact#3: Your freckle patterns will never change

I see this a lot in series with some sort of time skip. You see characters with freckles as a kid or teenager, then skip ahead ten years and find they have the same group of clusters on their cheeks that people all seem to find so endearing but nothing else. Now, while I can’t speak for anyone who has had freckles, I can speak for myself, my family, and my friends when I say YOU GET MORE FRECKLES. I can look back at pictures of myself as a child and noticeably seeing myself acquire more freckles as I get older. That being said, freckles can also fade, so it’s very believable for a character who had noticeable freckles when they were young to grow up to have ones that were so faded you didn’t really recognize them anymore.

Incorrect freckle fact#4: If it’s never seen the light of day, it doesn’t need a freckle

This is something I’ve noticed quite a bit in nsfw media where a character is at least partially nude. Now remember that in order to acquire freckles you need sun damage. So if said character isn’t known as a fan of being nude for sunbathing, there shouldn’t be freckles there. Just remember that freckles are like a tan.

Now, all that being said I can offer you some ideas on where freckles can and should be placed:

Shoulders: If someone has a lot freckles, a lot of them are concentrated in this area. It’s the area that people most often leave uncovered, and it’s directly underneath the sunlight most of the day as opposed to other areas which are sort of concealed under your own shadow

Collar Bone: This is another area of cluster freckles, especially on women considering often it is the only part of the chest that is exposed. With women, and with men to a lesser degree you will see a half circle of freckles. Imagine your character wearing a tank top and the half circle of freckles should follow that neckline. Unless your character is the type to never expose even that much in which case just remember that freckles are like a tan.

Legs: Another great place for freckle placement, they’re more likely to be less freckled then the other areas unless your character wears nothing but shorts.

Arms: Another area that can be heavily freckled. Unless your character wears nothing but long sleeve shirts

Face: Another area that can be heavily freckled, freckles on the face are most common across the cheeks and nose. They also occur often above the brow and the forehead if it isn’t covered by hair. They don’t occur very often around the mouth or the chin but it isn’t unheard of, and they’re often seen on the upper lip but usually less freckled

Miscellaneous: Freckles can occur in strange places. I have some on my eyelids, as well as the knuckles of my toe. Remember that freckles are like a tan (Have I said that enough yet to annoy you?) And with that in mind some of the things I might have suggested against in placement may work for your character, so you’ll have to make a judgement call.

Also remember freckles come in a large variety! Some peoples are big or small noticeable or faint, a lot or a little, more brown or more reddish so look around, do a little research!

You might just catch freckle fever~!

(Source: thisnameisquiterei, via art-and-sterf)

Filed under Writing writing reference reference references