Practice Makes Perfect

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Pixiv Resources Tags

randgris:

As a place where a crowd of artists is hanging out, pixiv is filled with tips, tutorials, and resources. But having a deal with its tags-based works arrangement can be a challenge. There is a list of tags labeling useful stuff on pixiv.

メイキング — “making”. Step-by-step records of creating a piece.
講座 — “course”. Tutorials of any kind.
フリー素材 or 素材 — “free material” or “material”. Textures, screentones, stock objects, et cetera.
ブラシ — “brush”.
トーン — “tone”. Screentones.
テクスチャ — “texture”.
パターン and シームレス — “pattern” and “seamless”.
線画 and 塗ってもいいのよ — “lineart” and “it’s okay to color”. Free linearts for coloring. Usually these tags are used together, but give a care to ascertain that “it’s okay to color” is presented.

A browsing tip for non-premium users.
By default, pixiv doesn’t allow to sort items by popularity. But there are specific tags indicating popular works, so you can reach the most popular pieces inside a category instantly by adding to the search query following tags: 10000users入り, 1000users入り, 500users入り. I. e. 講座10000users入り or  素材500users入り.

(via thatonewiththeponytail)

Filed under reference

4,163 notes

The Relative Color and the Absolute Color

colours-theory:

Since the colors are never what they look like, It’s useful to understand the color in two ways : the RELATIVE color and the ABSOLUTE color.

The Relative color is the color as it is seen, according to the perception of the eye and the translation from the brain to the mind.
The Absolute color is the color as it is, in reality.

This is part of the colors relationship, and the contrast of the colors.

To be able to get the right relative color (meaning without any false notes), it’s crucial to know what its absolute color really is.
image

For example, the absolute color of grey is very often the relative complementary color of its surrounding color.
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Depending of the kind of picture and depending of your color’s intentions (that is off special effect or narrative effect),
using an absolute complementary (that is, for the previous e.g, a true blue) in direct contact to its surrounding colors may easily create
a so much strong contrast that the mind will perceive it as a false note, then causing a global unbalance on all other colors in the image.

E.g, here is the page 05 from “Detectives” vol.02 (Hanna/Sure/Lou, ©Delcourt editions)
image

The “grey” panels 05 and 09 have a cold vibration, almost blue, because they are in a direct relationship within a yellow hot tan.
This two panels, in minority, are also secondary in the narration of the page.


Using a true absolute blue would reverse this narrative order because the color contrast would became so much strong that they would became the primary focal point of the page.
image

Let us look a little closer at the 3rd strip.
The mind read the left panel as cold, in a subtle blue. The shirts are read as white, and the bottles of champagne as greenish…
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…but by isolating the absolute colors, in comparison with a Titanium white, none of this previously mentioned relatives colors exist in this picture.
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…And if they were, the balance of the colors would be broken, and the falses notes would be made.
Notice how the eye now read differently the picture, it can’t stop looking at those white shirts and then those bottles.
It almost forget to look at the balloons and the characters. ( i’ll talk about the narration through the contrast of colors later, in another post)
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It is the same for the values.
A relative value defines itself compared with its surrounding values.
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Let’s look back at our 3rd strip.
Watch the contrast between the shirts, and the light jacket in the front, how they seem to be so much lighter in comparison with the other clothes.
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When in reality, if we compare them to each other, the difference became a lot more subtle than it seemed to be.
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This is a side effect of the relative color.
The mind analyzes et translates a color based on its database stocked in its memory, trying to identify the color in the most simple and efficient way possible.
image

The shirt itself is light indeed, and white. But it’s simply its “name”. Its “classification”, its “identity” (see the flat step of my quick step by step).
What we’ll ask in a store.

In reality, this shirt is not white, and not much lighter than the light face of the grey jacket or the blue shirt.
But for our mind, white means light. Lighter than everything.
However, a white shirt in shadow is often darker than a back shirt in the light, whatever the mind is saying.

So, compare, isolate, compare, isolate, compare, always.


You can change your “mind database” with some practice.
By using a paper sheet with holes to isolate outside colors. ( grey paper is best)
Or by opening some pictures in a software and use the color-picker to learn what is going on with the color relationship.
Testing yourself to find out the absolute color of your surrounding whenever you can.

Then, colorisation will become much easier, and like a musician able to reproduce a song he heard a the first try,
you’ll develop the Golden eye.

(via linaevelovesyou)

Filed under colours reference long post queue

503 notes

libutron:

Orange Pinwheel - Marasmius siccus
Arising from hardwood leaves and sticks, these tiny orange beach umbrellas are quite beautiful when fresh. The orange, pleated cap, the wiry stem, and the very distant gills make this Marasmius easy to recognize.
Marasmius siccus (Marasmiaceae) is found in Europe and east of the Great Plains in North America, and also has been recorded in South Korea and Japan.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Damon Tighe | Locality: Bukhansan National Park, Seoul, South Korea (2013)

libutron:

Orange Pinwheel - Marasmius siccus

Arising from hardwood leaves and sticks, these tiny orange beach umbrellas are quite beautiful when fresh. The orange, pleated cap, the wiry stem, and the very distant gills make this Marasmius easy to recognize.

Marasmius siccus (Marasmiaceae) is found in Europe and east of the Great Plains in North America, and also has been recorded in South Korea and Japan.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Damon Tighe | Locality: Bukhansan National Park, Seoul, South Korea (2013)

(via art-and-sterf)

Filed under scenery scenery reference reference references mushroom mushrooms mushroom reference

17,076 notes

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty

This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces.

Interesting notes

"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)

"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)

The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

(via art-and-sterf)

Filed under Reference references facial anatomy reference face facial anatomy eyebrow eyebrows character design character design reference