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Posts tagged lineart

2,078 notes

Using Photoshop’s “Black & White” adjustment vs. rough blue line art.

tonycliff:

When I draw a thing, I often first draw it rough using Col-Erase™ blue pencil. Then I go over top and make it look NICER using a dark pencil.

I used to remove the blue pencil from the image in Photoshop by selecting the “blue” channel of the RGB scan and turning that into the line art. That was the old way! This is the new way, and it is better!

Look at this drawing. This is what a raw scan usually looks like. See the faint blue lines in there? Ick.

image

This is what it looks like when I select the blue RGB channel:

image

It’s pretty effective, but not a critical hit. I can still see faint traces of the blue lines:

image

image

Normally I wouldn’t worry about it. I’d just blow ‘em out by increasing the contrast (through the Curves or Levels adjustment). BUT WHY SETTLE FOR THAT?

I don’t know when Photoshop introduced the Black & White adjustment tool, but it’s my new best friend. Let’s make a Black & White adjustment layer above our raw scan.

image

You’ll get this fun palette popping up:

image

… but you’ll still see the faint blue lines. They’ll be in black & white, but they’re still very visible. HOLD ON, that’s because we haven’t DONE ANYTHING yet.

CLICK! I select the “Blue Filter" preset:

image

Now look where those blue lines used to be:

image

You can even jack the sliders up to make your old blue lines look BRIGHTER, which is no big deal because our goal in the end will be to make that light-grey that used to be my white paper actually look white.

image

I’ma add a Curves adjustment layer.

image

Fiddle with the curves til your paper surface is white and your lines look about as good as they can look:

image

YOU CAN STOP NOW IF THAT’S ALL YOU WANT. Here’s some bonus shizz. I’m going to show you how to make the most useful line art you can have. Go to the Channels palette and command-click (or CTRL-click if you need your instructions to be that specific to your own personal life experience) the RGB channel’s thumbnail:

image

You’ll get a selection in the shape of your lines. Important : INVERT SELECTION. Don’t “invert” the contents of the selection, use the INVERT SELECTION menu thing or just press command-shift-I. Then make a new layer to accommodate your line art:

image

Fill the selection with your colour of choice:

image

Ta-da! You have useful line art. Why is this more useful than simply setting your line art layer to “Multiply?” Well, give it a try and see if you can’t come up with your own reason. Or just trust me. It’s MORE FLEXIBLE.

Enjoy!

(via afallowdoe)

Filed under Art lineart

211 notes

foervraengd:


It’s okay, english is not my native language either but I totally get what you mean :3
Hmmm it’s a very good question. I actually had to take a look at my oldest drawings in order to find out how and where I actually started painting single-layer style.
Due to certain circumstances when I was younger, I used programs like Oekakiboards to make my pictures. And those programs have a lot of limitations.
When I couldn’t have more than 1 or 2 layers, I pushed myself and got used to have all the colors on the same layer.
Also, I went to art school in High School - where I got to try out tradition opaque-paint (oils, acrylics, guache etc) which was very fun. When I got Corel Painter, it had some limitations as well (the latest version has a lot of improvements tho) but thanks to the blender-tool in Corel, as well as my basic knowledge for traditional drawing/painting, I started with shapes and silhouettes instead of lineart. I soon learned that I actually have more control over the painting when it wasn’t “trapped in a lineart”. If I saw that the hand looks odd, I can easily re-paint it - if you have a lineart in that situation, you would have to first re-draw the lineart and then adjust the color-layers and so on.
Also, lineart doesn’t exist in reality - the closest to lineart are actually tiny shadows between folds, cracks etc.
I often start with a silhouette, and then maybe I do a rough sketch to get the proportions right. And then I just paint over the areas where you would normally have lineart.
However, one of the first techniques that probably helped me out was this one:

You start with the sketch - or lineart, it’s not so important to have the lineart perfectly cleaned since it will be removed later.

Next, on a layer below it, you add the values and colors. it is important to include light and shadow as well. At this stage, I very often reduce the opacity of the lineart-layer.

Now I delete the lineart layer, and voilá! I have a pair of lips without lineart!
This technique was the first one I used for this. Later on, I started with silhouettes and values. But I think this might be a good technique for those who really REALLY have a hard time grasping the whole concept.

foervraengd:

It’s okay, english is not my native language either but I totally get what you mean :3

Hmmm it’s a very good question. I actually had to take a look at my oldest drawings in order to find out how and where I actually started painting single-layer style.

Due to certain circumstances when I was younger, I used programs like Oekakiboards to make my pictures. And those programs have a lot of limitations.

When I couldn’t have more than 1 or 2 layers, I pushed myself and got used to have all the colors on the same layer.

Also, I went to art school in High School - where I got to try out tradition opaque-paint (oils, acrylics, guache etc) which was very fun. When I got Corel Painter, it had some limitations as well (the latest version has a lot of improvements tho) but thanks to the blender-tool in Corel, as well as my basic knowledge for traditional drawing/painting, I started with shapes and silhouettes instead of lineart. I soon learned that I actually have more control over the painting when it wasn’t “trapped in a lineart”. If I saw that the hand looks odd, I can easily re-paint it - if you have a lineart in that situation, you would have to first re-draw the lineart and then adjust the color-layers and so on.

Also, lineart doesn’t exist in reality - the closest to lineart are actually tiny shadows between folds, cracks etc.

I often start with a silhouette, and then maybe I do a rough sketch to get the proportions right. And then I just paint over the areas where you would normally have lineart.

However, one of the first techniques that probably helped me out was this one:

You start with the sketch - or lineart, it’s not so important to have the lineart perfectly cleaned since it will be removed later.

Next, on a layer below it, you add the values and colors. it is important to include light and shadow as well. At this stage, I very often reduce the opacity of the lineart-layer.

Now I delete the lineart layer, and voilá! I have a pair of lips without lineart!

This technique was the first one I used for this. Later on, I started with silhouettes and values. But I think this might be a good technique for those who really REALLY have a hard time grasping the whole concept.

Filed under lineart digital painting digital digital art advice tips

874 notes

linework tips

pollums:

It’s really nice to hear that people are interested in my process!! Here’s some stuff that helps me with linework… and some inkers that I like….

1. Vary your line weight - Line weight creates interest and is a tool to tell your audience what to look at. Objects in the foreground get heavier line weight, objects in the background get lighter line weight. Big shapes get heavier, details get lighter. But in general, heavier lineweight indicates emphasis.

James Harren

2. Furiously redraw and hit ‘undo’ until you get the right line - The only way to get really good at smooth inking is years of practice, but while you’re waiting, ‘undo’ is a good way to get smooth lines if you’re working digitally. If you’re inking traditionally, make sure to have some white out pens and white gel pens handy. All the pros use white out.

Cliff Rathburn

3. Don’t be afraid to throw down some heavy blacks -  I think there’s some old comic rule that says each panel must be 50% black and 50% white… It helps to look at other artists and study how they use blacks unless you’re reading Tintin like me where everything takes place in eternal sunshine. Use heavy blacks to your advantage. Contrast attracts the eye. So use heavy blacks to direct the eye of your viewer.

Mike Mignola

4. Study artists with inks you admire - Not just artists with pretty art that you like! Study artists with GREAT INKS! Break down what makes them good and figure out what you can copy from them. I personally really like alla them silver age comic artists, Jack Kirby, Wally Wood and the like. Some more of my favorites include Joseph Clement Coll, Mike Mignola, Robert Fawcett, Chris Samnee, Cliff Rathburn, Dave Johnson, Mike Allred, Sean Gordon Murphy…. 

Dave Johnson

5. Don’t religiously follow your sketch. - The worst thing for a lot of people about inking is that they lose the life and spontaneity of their original sketch. They get all caught up in the imperfections of the thing that their inks turn out stiff. I usually do a rough sketch in a lighter color mapping out the basic shapes of what I’m doing. Then I lower the opacity of the sketch layer to 30% or less (I don’t want to see the sketch layer unless I squint, basically). Then I start inking on a layer on top of that, and it’s like I’m drawing it for the first time.

Anyway I hope that helps!

(via simonist)

Filed under lineart line art line work

144 notes

★*゜*★*゜*♪ Reryu’s Super Duper Basic Lineart Tutorial / Walkthrough ★*゜*★*゜*♪(ノ’口’)ノ

reryu:

[WARNING: Image heavy post!]

ヾ(*>ω<)ノ゜Hi guys!

Okay, well some of my friends were asking me to do a walk through on how I do my simple lineart sketches so I thought now would be a good time to. Especially before school starts haha. 

So anyways, I don’t want to do an overly detailed one, so I decided to do one that covers the basics. So I won’t go into detail but I will give a few pointers that has helped me out whenever I do my line arts. ☆^▽^☆

Every artist has his/her way of doing sketches or lineart and I’m definitely not a professional so I’ll just share how I do it and I hope it would help you somewhat. (Q∀Q ;;)

And also, I apologize in advance for the lack of definition in some of the photos. I used my Blackberry for all of them. I’ve yet to obtain a camera of my own so yeah Q.Q;; Hope you guys don’t mind.

Last but not least, enjoy! (ノ☆>u<)ノ

Read More

(via reryu-deactivated20140307)

Filed under lineart