Practice Makes Perfect

Practice Makes Perfect

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Posts tagged art

213 notes

oedipism:

I’ve been wanting to write something like this for a little while now.

Basically I wanted to let people who are illustrators know that if they have a condition that makes it more difficult to draw, that they can overcome it.

I’ve had fairly bad essential tremor (shaky hands) all my life, and while it’s getting worse with age, it’s not impossible to overcome it. Here are my left and right hands on a fairly average day~

image

image

And generally, I draw by steadying my dominant hand at the wrist with the other

image

But, what I want to address is the fact that it’s totally fine to get frustrated.

Whether it’s a mental or physical condition stopping you, you will inevitably get fed up, because it seriously sucks when you want to draw and just simply can’t do what you know you’d be perfectly capable otherwise.

Just be sure when this happens, to step away from the drawing, take a break for 10 minutes, then get back to it, otherwise you’re just going to make the situation worse. Don’t get into the mindset that you won’t be able to finish it if you don’t do it right now, because that’s not true, you can.

And most importantly, remember that your progress is going to be slower, depending on the severity of your condition. Don’t let that faze you, just work to the best of your abilities and practice as much as you can to catch up to everyone else.

Use your condition as a reason to practice more, not as an excuse to give up!

Filed under art drawing practice self help illustration advice condition disorder medical essential tremor shaky hands shakes tremor art help

978 notes

whatevercactus:

How to save hardened paint brushes!

This has been one of the most
useful tips I have learned while in
college so I thought I would share
how I save paint brushes that I was
too lazy to clean out good enough
the first time.
  1. Step One: go buy murphy oil soap, or check your cabinets and look for it. I was surprised when I saw it sitting in my cabinet at home because I had no idea we actually used to clean our house. It’s pretty common to find in stores. You can buy it at dollar general for just a few bucks.
  2. Step Two: take your brushes that you have let become really hard because you either used glue in them, or acrylic paint. Soak them for as much time as possible! The more you let them soak, the easier it will be to work apart the bristles. I have let mine soak anywhere from 24 hours to 96 hours.
  3. Step Three: once you have let your brushes soak, rinse the brush under slow moving water, use your hands to move the bristles around.. all you are trying to see how much the murphy oil soap did on its own, and if it is still a little stiff you will want to let it soak some more.
  4. Step Four: I have a pinch pot I made in a ceramics class to be able to wash my brushes. It doesn’t have to be anything fancy, but it does need to be textured! I drew patterns on the side so I could rub my brushes to make bristles start working in different directions. 
  5. Step Five: after you loosened the bristles by rubbing it on something textured, dip them back in the murphy oil soap and rub it a few more times on the textured surface. this allows the soap to get in all of the new openings in your paint brush.
  6. Step Six: rise it out with the bristles facing down so that anything hard comes out of your brush instead of staying up in the top. You should really use your hands a lot in this step to make sure any glue or paint chips are out.
  7. Step Seven: put a little bit more soap on the brush with a little bit of water, only dampening the bristles. leave it like that until the next time you want to use the brush, and it should be like new.
Bonus to this reference post:
one of my professors used murphy's to
get paint stains out of clothes. 

(Source: calebdraws)

Filed under art art resource art resources painting collage art reference art ref artref art help

96 notes

shipthenerd:

Painting fur, step by step
Fur practice that could be useful to anyone out there.
Tips:
- Use smaller brushes for each step (the smallest I used was 1.5)
- L a y e r s
- Use a medium sized, low opacity (about 3% or lower), eraser to blend each stroke with the previous layer
- Always start with the bottom layer of fur and work your way up, otherwise your strokes will get confusing and you’ll lose depth.
Here’s a really useful palette for hair colour, which can also be used for furs.
Also, this was painted as part of a medieval type outfit, not for an animal pelt. Technique may differ. 

shipthenerd:

Painting fur, step by step

Fur practice that could be useful to anyone out there.

Tips:

- Use smaller brushes for each step (the smallest I used was 1.5)

- L a y e r s

- Use a medium sized, low opacity (about 3% or lower), eraser to blend each stroke with the previous layer

- Always start with the bottom layer of fur and work your way up, otherwise your strokes will get confusing and you’ll lose depth.

Here’s a really useful palette for hair colour, which can also be used for furs.

Also, this was painted as part of a medieval type outfit, not for an animal pelt. Technique may differ. 

Filed under reference art tutorial painting tips how to furs digital art art help

213 notes

oedipism:

I’ve been wanting to write something like this for a little while now.

Basically I wanted to let people who are illustrators know that if they have a condition that makes it more difficult to draw, that they can overcome it.

I’ve had fairly bad essential tremor (shaky hands) all my life, and while it’s getting worse with age, it’s not impossible to overcome it. Here are my left and right hands on a fairly average day~

image

image

And generally, I draw by steadying my dominant hand at the wrist with the other

image

But, what I want to address is the fact that it’s totally fine to get frustrated.

Whether it’s a mental or physical condition stopping you, you will inevitably get fed up, because it seriously sucks when you want to draw and just simply can’t do what you know you’d be perfectly capable otherwise.

Just be sure when this happens, to step away from the drawing, take a break for 10 minutes, then get back to it, otherwise you’re just going to make the situation worse. Don’t get into the mindset that you won’t be able to finish it if you don’t do it right now, because that’s not true, you can.

And most importantly, remember that your progress is going to be slower, depending on the severity of your condition. Don’t let that faze you, just work to the best of your abilities and practice as much as you can to catch up to everyone else.

Use your condition as a reason to practice more, not as an excuse to give up!

Filed under art drawing practice self help illustration advice condition disorder medical essential tremor shaky hands shakes tremor art help